Three policies

The Three Policies of the Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering

Diploma Policy

Informatics, which is becoming an essential discipline as one of the fundamental sciences providing the foundations for various scientific methodologies, and electrical and electronic engineering, which has a long history and a wide range of industrial fields and has also become the progenitor of the information industry, are closely related to each other and will transform society, culture, and the economy, contributing significantly to the sustainable development of society. Even at the national level, the Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering is a unique postgraduate educational organization that integrates informatics with electrical and electronic engineering. Capitalizing on this uniqueness, it fosters researchers and engineers who have extensive intellectual interests, global mindedness, and integrity, who furthermore possess sophisticated expertise and research and development capabilities in the fields of informatics and electrical and electronic engineering, and who take the lead in developing and applying new research to meet the needs of a changing society.

Curriculum Policy

In order to achieve the diploma policy, curricula have been organized in each department (and in each course in the case of the master’s program) as shown here in the Curriculum Outline. Likewise, in the Global Course, the same educational content as shown in the Curriculum Outline will be provided in English according to the departments and courses the students are enrolled in.

[Coursework]
As shown below, subjects have been categorized and the number of credits required in each category has been determined so that students can sufficiently balance the theories and knowledge that form the foundations for each field in information science and technology and electrical and electronic engineering, developments in those fields, the content of related fields, and what the students have learned from their own studies. Completion requirements have been set at a minimum of 45 credits for the master’s program and a minimum of 16 credits for the doctoral program. The 45 credits required to complete the master’s program is in line with international standards and ensures the quality of the curriculum.

Master Course

  • Core subjects: those concerning the theories and knowledge that form the foundations for the courses. In addition to understanding theoretical knowledge, students develop their skills in logical thinking.
  • Advanced subjects: those concerning the developments in the courses. Students expand and enrich their knowledge and comprehension in the fields of the courses, and enhance their problem solving skills.
  • Study subjects: those focusing on training, including subjects utilizing goal-oriented and active learning methods. Students cultivate practical skills as well as their abilities to plan research projects collaboratively and carry them out proactively.
  • Enrichment subjects: those concerning fields peripheral and related to the courses. Enrichment subjects are categorized into field specific, comprehensive as well as practical and applied. Field specific consists of subjects peripheral and related to course fields, and students choose a field and take at least the designated number of credits from it. Accordingly, students acquire well-balanced expertise, capable of meeting diverse societal demands and engaging in inter-disciplinary areas. Comprehensive consists of subjects in which students master an even wider range of fields, such as the mathematical subjects common to all courses at the Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, the subjects that integrate informatics with electrical and electronic engineering, and the subjects offered at other graduate schools. Practical and applied are subjects that utilize hands-on practical training to aid students in acquiring the ability to transform the knowledge and skills they have learned in the classroom into real-world practice and application. Students select and take subjects on a subject-by-subject basis.

Doctoral Program

  • Major subjects: those related to advanced research in the students’ departments.
  • Institution-wide subjects: those on extensive and advanced knowledge related to information science and electrical engineering.

Note that, should students show remarkable progress in their studies and research, they can shorten their enrollment period.

Admission Policy

At Kyushu University, in order to achieve the mission and purpose of our educational charter, we seek students who, based on the broad range of basic subjects and courses they have taken at high school, will acquire a disposition for self-learning through the comprehensive liberal arts and basic specialized education offered at university, and will furthermore mature into individuals who can solve problems from a broad perspective while collaborating with others in addition to examining and considering the questions they themselves have posed creatively and critically.

Additionally, at the Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, we seek students who aspire to become researchers and engineers who have extensive intellectual interests, global mindedness, and integrity, who furthermore possess sophisticated expertise and research and development capabilities in the fields of informatics and electrical and electronic engineering, and who take the lead in developing and applying new research to meet the needs of a changing society in such fields as computers, software, communications, electronic devices, electronic and electrical equipment, and instrumentation and control.

The Kind of Students We Seek

  • Knowledge and skills. For those entering the master’s program, we seek students who have mastered the knowledge and skills provided by the basic subjects and courses in information, communications, and electrical and electronic engineering during their four years as an undergraduate. Regarding those entering the doctoral program, we seek students who have mastered the knowledge and skills provided by the subjects in information, communications, and electrical and electronic engineering up through the master’s program, and have acquired the skills to conduct research in said fields.
  • Faculties for thinking, judging, and expressing oneself. We seek students who possess talents for thinking logically and multilaterally, criticizing objectively, and communicating with others in their own words. They have a disposition that spares no effort in acquiring applied skills, creativity, and global mindedness.
  • The will to learn by taking the lead and collaborating with diverse people. We seek students who respect diversity, accept different ideas, and have the desire to always try to improve themselves.

Department of Information Science and Technologys

Diploma Policy

At the Department of Informatics, by systematically educating and researching information science and technology (a new discipline investigating the nature of the various phenomena called information related to nature, society, and humanity from both the viewpoints of form and meaning), we develop advanced technologies for an advanced information society and foster human resources who are capable of demonstrating new visions for information science and technology with an international perspective.

[Master’s Program]
Department of Informatics, Information Architecture and Security Course

  • A-1. Proactive Learning. Students will be able to identify problems themselves and examine and consider those problems creatively and critically against a backdrop of in-depth expertise and a rich and varied education.
  • A-2. Collaboration. Students will be able to exchange diverse knowledge and collaborate with others to solve problems.
  • B-1. Knowledge and Comprehension.
    • B-1-1. Students will have and be able to explain the foundational knowledge of information science and electrical engineering as well as the general knowledge of information society infrastructure underlying information architecture and security.
    • B-1-2. Students will be able to explain the various theories and concepts in the field of ICT, such as computers, software, and communications, which underlie information architecture and security.
    • B-1-3. Students will have knowledge of the intersection between different fields in addition to being able to explain the theories and concepts of fields peripheral to information architecture and security. 
  • C-1. Application and Analysis.
    • C-1-1. Students will have fundamental knowledge of the processes, systems, and methods necessary for conducting research in the field of information architecture and security, and be able to analyze, test, and evaluate using such knowledge.
    • C-1-2. Students will have specialized fundamental knowledge in the field of information architecture and security, and be able to identify and solve problems related to the field.
  • C-2. Evaluation and Realization.
    • C-2-1. Students will be able to formulate research plans themselves and proactively conduct research in the field of information architecture and security.
    • C-2-2. Students will comprehend cutting-edge research trends in the field of information architecture and security, and be able to adequately explain their own research.
  • D. Implementation.
    • D-1. Students will analyze the limitations, impact, and results of their research, and be able identify new problems and propose solutions.
    • D-2. Students will have the knowledge and skills to practice their research in the real world.

[Master’s Program]
Department of Informatics, Data Science Course

  • A-1. Proactive Learning. Students will be able to identify problems themselves and examine and consider those problems creatively and critically against a backdrop of in-depth expertise and a rich and varied education.
  • A-2. Collaboration. Students will be able to exchange diverse knowledge and collaborate with others to solve problems.
  • B-1. Knowledge and Comprehension.
    • B-1-1. Students will have and be able to explain the knowledge underlying information science and electrical engineering.
    • B-1-2. Students will acquire a mathematical foundation in probability, statistics, optimization, algorithms, and machine learning.
    • B-1-3. Students will become familiar with the typical methods of machine learning and examples of the practical application of data science.
  • C-1. Application and Analysis.
    • C-1-1. Students will be able to formulate problems from the perspective of data analysis in various fields.
    • C-1-2. Students will be able to choose effective methods for data analysis problems in various fields.
  • C-2. Evaluation and Realization.
    • C-2-1. Students will be able to use their knowledge and comprehension in designing program implementation for data analysis in line with designated requirements.
    • C-2-2. Students will be able to suggest useful courses of action in the domain of data science for solving social problems.
  • D. Implementation.
    • D-1. Students will have a disposition for identifying, formulating, and solving problems logically and independently, and be able to endeavor independently in problem solving by combining knowledge and skills.
    • D-2. Students will be able to collect and interpret the necessary data and make the appropriate decisions.

[Master’s Program]
Department of Informatics, AI and Robotics Course

  • A-1. Proactive Learning. Students will be able to identify problems themselves and examine and consider those problems creatively and critically against a backdrop of in-depth expertise and a rich and varied education.
  • A-2. Collaboration. Students will be able to exchange diverse knowledge and collaborate with others to solve problems.
  • B-1. Knowledge and Comprehension.
    • B-1-1. Students will have and be able to explain the knowledge underlying information science and electrical engineering.
    • B-1-2. Students will be able to master such knowledge underlying the field of AI and robotics as pattern recognition, robotics, game theory, and human interface.
    • B-1-3. Students will be able to acquire the practical knowledge necessary to advanced engineers and researchers in the field of AI and robotics by securing knowledge peripheral to the field.
  • C-1. Application and Analysis.
    • C-1-1. Students will be able to explain how to apply expertise in the field of AI and robotics to engineering problems.
    • C-1-2. Students will be able to comprehend and perform theoretical, experimental, and numerical analytical methods using their expertise in the field of AI and robotics to solve engineering problems.
  • C-2. Evaluation and Realization.
    • C-2-1. Students will be able to make practical use of a combination of knowledge and skills in the field of AI and robotics toward the realization of a cyber-physical system.
    • C-2-2. Students will be able to suggest useful courses of action in the field of AI and robotics for solving social problems.
  • D. Implementation.
    • D-1. Students will have a disposition for identifying, formulating, and solving problems logically and independently, and be able to endeavor independently in problem solving by combining knowledge and skills.
    • D-2. Students will be able to endeavor in problem solving, always mindful of the impact of technology on society and with a sense of responsibility toward society and an ethical perspective.

[Doctoral Program]
Department of Informatics

  • A-1. Proactive Learning. Students will be able to master the latest research in informatics, identify problems themselves, and examine and consider those problems creatively and critically.
  • A-2. Collaboration. Students will be able to exchange diverse knowledge and collaborate with others to solve problems.
  • B-1. Knowledge and Comprehension.
    • B-1-1. Students will be able to master a broad range of fundamental knowledge so that they might take the lead in informatics.
    • B-1-2. Students will be able to acquire the practical knowledge necessary to engineers and researchers who take the lead in informatics by acquiring peripheral knowledge.
  • C-1. Application and Analysis.
    • C-1-1. Students will be able to explain how to apply expertise to engineering problems.
    • C-1-2. Students will be able to comprehend and perform theoretical, experimental, and numerical analytical methods using their expertise to solve engineering problems.
  • C-2. Evaluation and Realization.
    • C-2-1. Students will be able to make practical use of a combination of knowledge and skills in the field of informatics toward the realization of an advanced information society.
    • C-2-2. Students will be able to suggest useful courses of action in the field of informatics for solving social problems and play a leading role in that research field.
  • D. Implementation.
    • D-1. Students will have a disposition for identifying, formulating, and solving problems logically and independently, and be able to exchange opinions on technical matters with both experts and laypeople while endeavoring in problem solving by combining knowledge and skills.
    • D-2. Students will be able to collect and interpret the necessary data and make the appropriate decisions.
    • D-3. Students will be able to endeavor in problem solving, always mindful of the impact of technology on society and with a sense of responsibility toward society and an ethical perspective. Moreover, they will have the linguistic competence to communicate, make educational research presentations, and manage projects in English.

Curriculum Policy

In order to achieve the diploma policy, curricula have been organized in each department (and in each course in the case of the master’s program) as shown in the Curriculum Outline. Likewise, in the Global Course, the same educational content as shown in the Curriculum Outline will be provided in English according to the departments and courses the students are enrolled in.

[Coursework]
As shown below, subjects have been categorized and the number of credits required in each category has been determined so that students can sufficiently balance the theories and knowledge that form the foundations for each field in information science and technology and electrical and electronic engineering, developments in those fields, the content of related fields, and what the students have learned from their own studies. Completion requirements have been set at a minimum of 45 credits for the master’s program and a minimum of 16 credits for the doctoral program. The 45 credits required to complete the master’s program is in line with international standards and ensures the quality of the curriculum.

Master Course

  • Core subjects: those concerning the theories and knowledge that form the foundations for the courses. In addition to understanding theoretical knowledge, students develop their skills in logical thinking.
  • Advanced subjects: those concerning the developments in the courses. Students expand and enrich their knowledge and comprehension in the fields of the courses, and enhance their problem solving skills.
  • Study subjects: those focusing on training, including subjects utilizing goal-oriented and active learning methods. Students cultivate practical skills as well as their abilities to plan research projects collaboratively and carry them out proactively.
  • Enrichment subjects: those concerning fields peripheral and related to the courses. Enrichment subjects are categorized into field specific, comprehensive as well as practical and applied. Field specific consists of subjects peripheral and related to course fields, and students choose a field and take at least the designated number of credits from it. Accordingly, students acquire well-balanced expertise, capable of meeting diverse societal demands and engaging in inter-disciplinary areas. Comprehensive consists of subjects in which students master an even wider range of fields, such as the mathematical subjects common to all courses at the Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, the subjects that integrate informatics with electrical and electronic engineering, and the subjects offered at other graduate schools. Practical and applied are subjects that utilize hands-on practical training to aid students in acquiring the ability to transform the knowledge and skills they have learned in the classroom into real-world practice and application. Students select and take subjects on a subject-by-subject basis.

Doctoral Program

  • Major subjects: those related to advanced research in the students’ departments.
  • Institution-wide subjects: those on extensive and advanced knowledge related to information science and electrical engineering.

Note that, should students show remarkable progress in their studies and research, they can shorten their enrollment period.

Admission Policy

At the Department of Informatics, we seek the following kind of applicants.

[Master’s Program]

  • Students who have the ambition to make contributions toward the development of informatics through the research and development of advanced technologies.
  • Students who aspired to master both the fundamental theories and expertise of information.
  • Students who are not only interested in comprehending concepts in the mind, but also in learning through practical experience with technology.
  • Students who endeavor in the research of fundamental theories, always mindful of its applications.
  • Students who can conduct applied research based on the fundamental theories.
  • Students with the courage to challenge themselves in new fields.

[Doctoral Program]
We accept students who are comfortable with such fundamental theories as those of mathematics as well as the expertise belonging to this particular field, and moreover, have the following aspirations.

  • Students who aspire to become engineers and researchers whose fortes are formulating proposals and identifying problems and have abundant global mindedness, creativity, and independence.
  • Students who aspire to become the leaders responsible for the coming advanced information society, responding to social and industrial pressures.
  • Students who aspire to actively participate in exchanges between industry-academia-government as well as other researchers and to further enhance their own research and development skills.

Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Diploma Policy

The Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering trains human resources who systematically comprehend a high degree of fundamental knowledge in electrical, electronic, and communications engineering; who have creative abilities (the ability to come up with ideas), planning abilities (the ability to give those ideas tangible form), and persuasive abilities (the ability to convince others with those ideas) in addition to expertise with a command over areas of information technology such as data science; who endeavor in solving increasingly complex problems with ingenuity that draws upon sophisticated expertise in the fields of information and communication as well as social infrastructure systems dealing with energy; and who are capable of taking the lead in new research and development and implementation that responds to the changes in society such as Society 5.0.

[Master’s Program]
The Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Information Devices and Systems Course

  • A-1. Proactive Learning. Students will be able to identify problems themselves and examine and consider those problems creatively and critically against a backdrop of in-depth expertise and a rich and varied education.
  • A-2. Collaboration. Students will be able to exchange diverse knowledge and collaborate with others to solve problems.
  • B-1.
    • B-1-1. Students will have fundamental knowledge of information devices and systems along with the core fundamental knowledge of electronic devices, electrical and electronic materials, process technologies, semiconductor integrated circuits, nanotechnologies, organic biodevices, information transmission technologies, information and communication systems, and electronic and optical fusion systems.
    • B-1-2. Students will systematically comprehend a wide range of cutting-edge research fields in information devices and systems.
  • C-1. Application and Analysis.
    • C-1-1. As for the control of electrical and electronic materials in the nanometer range as well as their application in cutting-edge devices, nanotechnologies for device integration, and integration technologies for electronic devices (a fundamental element of information and communication systems), students will be able to skillfully command advanced technologies from both theoretical and experimental standpoints that include data science.
  • C-2. Evaluation and Realization.
    • C-2-1. Students will be able to define problem areas related to the construction and operation of information devices and systems and conduct research in order to solve them.
    • C-2-2. Students will be able to apply information technologies such as data science and AI as engineers and propose valuable information devices and systems.
  • D. Implementation.
    • D-1. Students will acquire the methods and logical thinking skills shared between the natural sciences and information devices and systems, and have the ability to collect and arrange the information necessary to solve problems.
    • D-2. By collaborating with all kinds of talented people, students will be able to create new social value for the future with an interdisciplinary point of view.
    • D-3. Students will be able to accurately explain the technologies and principles related to information devices and systems in the international arena.
    • D-4. Students will comprehend the impact of technology on society, have a sense of responsibility regarding the realization of a safe society and an ethical perspective, and have the desire to try to make their own contributions toward the development of technology. Knowledge and comprehension.

[Master’s Program]
The Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Energy Devices and Systems Course

  • A-1. Proactive Learning. Students will be able to identify problems themselves and examine and consider those problems creatively and critically against a backdrop of in-depth expertise and a rich and varied education.
  • A-2. Collaboration. Students will be able to exchange diverse knowledge and collaborate with others to solve problems.
  • B-1. Knowledge and Comprehension.
    • B-1-1. Students will have fundamental knowledge of energy devices and systems along with the core fundamental knowledge of electrical and electromagnetic energy engineering, instrumentation and control engineering, superconductivity engineering, and power electronics.
    • B-1-2. Students will systematically comprehend a wide range of cutting-edge research fields in energy devices and systems.
  • C-1. Application and Analysis.
    • C-1-1. As for optimum design technologies for superconducting and electromagnetic systems along with social systems, instrumentation and control technologies using artificial intelligence, and technologies for the generation, transfer, conversion, and storage of electrical energy, students will be able to skillfully command advanced technologies from both theoretical and experimental standpoints that include data science.
  • C-2. Evaluation and Realization.
    • C-2-1. Students will be able to define problem areas related to the construction and operation of energy devices and systems and conduct research in order to solve them.
    • C-2-2. Students will be able to apply information technologies such as data science and AI as engineers and propose valuable energy device systems.
  • D. Implementation.
    • D-1. Students will acquire the methods of natural sciences and logical thinking skills shared between energy devices and systems, and have the ability to collect and arrange the information necessary to solve problems.
    • D-2. By collaborating with all kinds of talented people, students will be able to create new social value for the future with an interdisciplinary point of view.
    • D-3. Students will be able to accurately explain the technologies and principles related to energy devices and systems in the international arena.
    • D-4. Students will comprehend the impact of technology on society, have a sense of responsibility regarding the realization of a safe society and an ethical perspective, and have the desire to try to make their own contributions toward the development of technology.

[Doctoral Program]
The Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

  • A-1. Proactive Learning. Students will be able to master the latest research in electrical and electronic engineering, identify problems themselves, and examine and consider those problems creatively and critically.
  • A-2. Collaboration. Students will be able to exchange diverse knowledge and collaborate with others to solve problems.
  • B-1. Knowledge and Comprehension.
    • B-1-1. Students will have the core cutting-edge knowledge of electrical and electronic systems, instrumentation and control systems, electrical energy, power electronics, electrical and electronic material properties, electronic devices, integrated systems, and information and communication.
  • C-1. Application and Analysis.
    • C-1-1. With respect to the control of electrical and electronic materials in the nanometer range as well as their application in cutting-edge devices, nanotechnologies for device integration, and integration technologies for electronic devices (a fundamental element of information and communication systems), optimum design technologies for superconducting and electromagnetic systems along with social systems, instrumentation and control technologies using artificial intelligence, and technologies for the generation, transfer, conversion, and storage of electrical energy, students will be able to skillfully command advanced technologies from both theoretical and experimental standpoints that include data science.
  • C-2. Evaluation and Realization.
    • C-2-1. Students will be able to evaluate research trends and their practical application in the real world to identify any problems in need of a solution.
    • C-2-2. Students will have the creative abilities to produce innovative and cutting-edge electronic devices, electrical and electronic systems, instrumentation and control, and techniques for their utilization.
  • D. Implementation.
    • D-1. Students will endeavor in solving increasingly complex problems with ingenuity that draws upon sophisticated expertise in the fields of information and communication as well as electrical and electronic systems, and by collaborating with all kinds of talented people, be able to create new social value for the future with an interdisciplinary point of view.
    • D-2. Students will have argumentation, presentation, project management, intellectual property, international communication, and teaching skills in addition to the ability to plan and implement new technologies.

Curriculum Policy

In order to achieve the diploma policy, curricula have been organized in each department (and in each course in the case of the master’s program) as shown in the Curriculum Outline. Likewise, in the Global Course, the same educational content as shown in the Curriculum Outline will be provided in English according to the departments and courses the students are enrolled in.

[Coursework]
As shown below, subjects have been categorized and the number of credits required in each category has been determined so that students can sufficiently balance the theories and knowledge that form the foundations for each field in information science and technology and electrical and electronic engineering, developments in those fields, the content of related fields, and what the students have learned from their own studies. Completion requirements have been set at a minimum of 45 credits for the master’s program and a minimum of 16 credits for the doctoral program. The 45 credits required to complete the master’s program is in line with international standards and ensures the quality of the curriculum.

Master Course

  • Core subjects: those concerning the theories and knowledge that form the foundations for the courses. In addition to understanding theoretical knowledge, students develop their skills in logical thinking.
  • Advanced subjects: those concerning the developments in the courses. Students expand and enrich their knowledge and comprehension in the fields of the courses, and enhance their problem solving skills.
  • Study subjects: those focusing on training, including subjects utilizing goal-oriented and active learning methods. Students cultivate practical skills as well as their abilities to plan research projects collaboratively and carry them out proactively.
  • Enrichment subjects: those concerning fields peripheral and related to the courses. Enrichment subjects are categorized into field specific, comprehensive as well as practical and applied. Field specific consists of subjects peripheral and related to course fields, and students choose a field and take at least the designated number of credits from it. Accordingly, students acquire well-balanced expertise, capable of meeting diverse societal demands and engaging in inter-disciplinary areas. Comprehensive consists of subjects in which students master an even wider range of fields, such as the mathematical subjects common to all courses at the Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, the subjects that integrate informatics with electrical and electronic engineering, and the subjects offered at other graduate schools. Practical and applied are subjects that utilize hands-on practical training and collaboration between students in related fields to aid students in acquiring the ability to transform the knowledge and skills they have learned in the classroom into real-world practice and application. Students select and take subjects on a subject-by-subject basis.

Doctoral Program

  • Major subjects: a group of those related to advanced research in the department.
  • Related subjects: those in fields other than the students’ departments and those core to graduate education.
  • Institution-wide subjects: those on extensive and advanced knowledge related to information science and electrical engineering.

Note that, should students show remarkable progress in their studies and research, they can shorten their enrollment period.

Admission Policy

At the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, we seek the following kind of applicants.

[Master’s Program]

  • Students who possess fundamental academic skills in either the domains of electrical, electronic, or information systems.
  • Students with the self-motivation to identify various problems on their own, set tasks in order to solve them, and try to study to achieve a thorough understanding of them.
  • Students who are ready to make the effort to acquire fundamental skills and have the desire and ability to proactively advance their studies.
  • Students who have acquired a rigid ethical perspective as bachelors of engineering in addition to having the ambition to become researchers and engineers with the can-do spirit to clear the way for and develop new fields.

[Doctoral Program]

  • Students with the initiative to identify various problems in either the domains of electrical, electronic, or information systems on their own, set tasks in order to solve them, and try to study to achieve a thorough understanding of them.
  • Students who aspire to become world-leading researchers and engineers in their fields of expertise.
  • Students who have acquired a rigid ethical perspective as masters of engineering in addition to having the ambition to become researchers and engineers with the can-do spirit to clear the way for and develop new fields.